COVID-19 Resource Center

The definition of mobility is radically different than it was quite recently. With a ringing chorus of #flattenthecurve, social distancing and the shuttering of community events, workplaces, and gatherings is now the norm. Mobility managers’ roles have always needed to be fluid – shifting to address the changing mobility needs of local riders and community members. Now more than ever, the flexibility, creativity, and empathy that are pillars of this work will be critical to serving your community. For example, transportation services typically help community members travel to get groceries, medications, and other essential supplies. Now, we are asking how can we bring groceries, medications, etc. to the community members? 

While there is much to learn regarding COVID-19, NCMM has published a blog post on steps mobility managers can take during this time to support their communities which you can access below, in addition to the resources from APTA, CTAA, and Easterseals. Additionally, please let us know how you are handling the pandemic through our brief survey at the bottom of this page. 

Tell us how you are responding to COVID-19:

Please tell us how you are responding to the coronavirus pandemic. Check as many of the answers that apply to your situation. Please use the additional comments box to provide more details to your answers.

Daily Mobility News on COVID-19

Why infrastructure is the only way to fight a COVID-19 recession in the US

“In fighting the COVID-19 crisis, the Federal Reserve has used all of its monetary tools. A new recession is underway or, as some may say, it’s already here. When monetary policy isn’t enough, a country must turn towards fiscal policy. Right now, reviving the lagging US infrastructure sector may be the best approach: infrastructure creates economic growth, 5G cellular infrastructure

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How to create a viable alternative for cities without public transit access

“Imagine a robust public transit system, at the snap of a finger, could be in full swing in small- to mid-sized cities across the U.S. Sure, ridership might be low at the start. But eventually, communities would start to feel the positive impacts of public transit — increased economic opportunities and savings, decreased accidents, gasoline consumption, and carbon footprint. Over

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